HFR Executive Director, Minda Schweizer (right), pictured with leaders from World Relief Southern California and Al Otro Lado.

HFR Executive Director, Minda Schweizer (right), pictured with leaders from World Relief Southern California and Al Otro Lado.

Home for Refugees USA has the unbelievable privilege to help provide volunteer teams in the reunification and resettlement of 29 families seeking asylum from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador who were separated from their children this past year. This is an immense undertaking, and we are partnering with several other agencies to get this done - Home for Refugees, World Relief, Matthew 25, Families Belong Together, Al Otro Lado, and Together Rising. 

We need your help, and the help of your networks, to successfully reunite and serve all these families. There are two ways you can help, 1) by clicking on the button above and giving to our initial startup campaign and 2) by becoming a sponsor and hosting a family while we help them reunite with their children and navigate the asylum process and resettle in the U.S.

Home for Refugees USA

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Since 2017, Home for Refugees USA has provided care to refugees and asylum-seekers fleeing their home countries in need of resettlement in the United States. HFR’s guiding belief is that within every city there already exists the necessary resources for stability and successful resettlement. We resettle newly arrived refugees and asylum-seekers by leveraging networks within faith groups and community groups who commit to walking alongside a family for at least a 12-month period. This model ensures that refugees would get a good start at resettlement and asylum-seekers will have their basic needs met in order to be physically, emotionally, and mentally present during the demanding process of seeking asylum in the United States. For the long term, we hope both refugees and asylum-seekers will be empowered to sustain new homes, find new hope, and fully experience life.

Collaboration and Giving

HFR’s existing collaborative relationships to receive refugees and asylum-seekers include World Relief Southern CA, International Rescue Committee in Los Angeles, International Institute of Los Angeles, Human Rights Watch, USC Gould School of Law, and Al Otro Lado, and we are actively advocating for fair and humane immigration alongside Families Belong Together, Matthew 25, Together Rising, the Orange County Jewish Coalition for Refugees, and Presbyterian Disaster Assistance.

Click now to ReUnite families!

Click now to ReUnite families!

Tax-deductible donations made to our GoFundMe campaign will go to Home for Refugees USA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Thank you for joining this movement - for your contribution, for sharing this campaign with others, and for standing together with us, so that all people can live in safety, freedom, dignity, and have a place to call "Home."

The need here is so great, and our startup campaign is just beginning. We'll continue to raise our goal as the campaign continues.

Become A Sponsor

Home for Refugees is looking for United States’ sponsors for our Central American Families Reunification Project

What are the requirements to sponsor an asylum seeker?

  • Sponsor must have current immigration status in the US (US Citizen, Legal Permanent Resident)

  • Sponsor must have income or assets that reach at least 125% of the federal poverty guidelines levels for a family of the appropriate size (refer to https://www.uscis.gov/i-864p)

  • Sponsor must have a fixed address where they can demonstrate they have resided for a significant period of time (over 1 year)

  • Sponsor must be able to provide asylum seeker with a safe, comfortable place to sleep

  • Sponsor must be able to provide asylum seeker with basic necessities (food, occasional transportation, items of clothing, etc.)

  • Sponsor must have financial means to support asylum seekers (food, basic clothing, required transportation, etc.)

Does the sponsor have to live in a certain part of the country?

Yes, a sponsor must live within a two hour drive to a federal immigration court to allow for regular attendance of the asylum seeker to all their immigration court hearings, check-ins, and any other appointments requested by DHS/ICE/BorderPatrol. Check online for your closest immigration court.

What is the time commitment?

  • Sponsor is responsible to receive the asylum seeker after they are released from detention

  • Sponsorship of an asylum seeker is an undefined period of time to be determined by the asylum seeker (if an adult) and the sponsor. Usually until the time the asylum seeker is granted asylum which can take about 18 months to two years

  • Asylum seeker has the right to move at any time for any reason

  • Sponsor has the right to ask the asylum seeker to move out for any reason

What if the asylum seeker moves do I have to tell ICE?

It is the asylum seeker’s responsibility to inform ICE if they move. It is always best for the sponsor to assist the asylum seeker to inform ICE of any change of address.

What if the asylum seeker doesn’t show up to court?

It is the responsibility of the asylum seeker to show up in court. It is a best practice for the sponsor to be well aware of all court hearings and make plans with the asylum seeker to be able to attend all their immigration court hearings, check-ins, and any other appointments requested by DHS/ICE/Border Patrol. If the asylum seeker does not show up in court, it is possible that ICE may come to the sponsor’s residence to inquire about the whereabouts of the asylum seeker. There is no repercussion for the sponsor if the asylum seeker does not show up in court.

What if I change my mind after a few months?

The sponsor may ask the asylum seeker to move out at any point

What if I move?

If the sponsor moves it is a best practice for the sponsor to assist the asylum seeker in informing ICE and the immigration court of this change of address, which is best facilitated by a legal service provider experienced in asylum cases or immigration law.

Does the asylum seeker have to live with me?

The sponsor agrees to receive the asylum seeker in their home after they are released from detention.

Are they able to work?

It depends case by case. The asylum seeker should consult with an experienced immigration attorney and/or legal service provider that works with asylum cases.

Can they travel outside of the state and if they do am I required to tell someone?

Yes, the asylum seeker can travel outside of the state, unless specifically stated in the custody determination with ICE and/or the immigration court. The sponsor is not required to tell anyone of the asylum seeker’s travel. The asylum seeker should always let their ICE office know if they intend to travel outside of the state (location and period of time).

If someone commits a crime or gets in trouble with ICE am I liable?

The sponsor is not liable if someone commits a crime unless they have participated in the crime or can be implicated in the crime. The sponsor is not liable if the asylum seeker violates the terms of their custody with ICE.

Am I financially responsible for the asylum seeker?

The sponsor is not legally financially responsible for the asylum seeker, but SHOULD take responsibility for the asylum seeker’s basic necessities while they are living in their home (food, basic clothing, required transportation, etc.).

Do they have health insurance? If they get hurt what do I do?

Asylum seekers do not have health insurance. If they get hurt they should seek appropriate medical services within the collective means of the sponsor and asylum seeker.

Can they get a driver’s license?

It depends case by case. The asylum seeker should consult with an experienced immigration attorney and/or legal service provider that works with asylum cases. If you are interested in talking with someone more about becoming a sponsor to help reunify separated families, fill out the contact information box below.

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